Test for Manganese Levels

Whole blood manganese levels are considered to be a reliable measure of body manganese. Hair manganese levels also correlate well with manganese levels in other body tissues, but dark hair dyes can contain manganese and thus falsely elevate readings. In the case of extremely high manganese levels obtained from scalp hair, pubic hair should be tested as a control. Low hair manganese levels are considered reliable.

 


Test for Manganese Levels can help with the following

Addictions  


Allergy  

Allergies Indoor

Low blood manganese levels may accentuate allergies.



 

Allergic Rhinitis / Hay Fever

Low blood manganese levels may accentuate allergies.



Environment / Toxicity  

Zinc Toxicity

Zinc causes a decrease in serum manganese levels.



Hormones  


 


Mental  


 


Metabolic  


Nervous System  

Seizure Disorder

Sohler (1979) compared blood manganese (Mn) levels in a group of patients with seizure activity to those in a control group. Blood Mn levels from control subjects had a mean of 14.8ng/gm (ppb). The blood Mn levels were significantly lower in the patients with seizure activity, at 9.9 +/- 4.9ng/gm, p < 0.005). In uncontrolled trials several doctors found that Mn is helpful in controlling seizures of both minor and major types.

In one case report, a twelve-year-old boy with poorly controlled epilepsy experienced a reduction in seizure frequency after receiving 20mg per day of manganese. Although this research is encouraging, it must still be considered preliminary.



Key

May do some good
Likely to help
Highly recommended

Glossary

Manganese

An essential mineral found in trace amounts in tissues of the body. Adults normally contain an average of 10 to 20mg of manganese in their bodies, most of which is contained in bone, the liver and the kidneys. Manganese is essential to several critical enzymes necessary for energy production, bone and blood formation, nerve function and protein metabolism. It is involved in the metabolism of fats and glucose, the production of cholesterol and it allows the body to use thiamine and Vitamin E. It is also involved in the building and degrading of proteins and nucleic acid, biogenic amine metabolism, which involves the transmitting of nerve impulses.

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