DMAE

DMAE is an antioxidant and free radical deactivator which is found naturally in the human brain. It is thought to be the precursor for acetylcholine which conducts nerve impulses within the brain (a neurotransmitter). The theory is that by increasing the production of acetylcholine, DMAE can help improve memory and learning as well as perhaps reducing memory loss in older adults. Some individuals also report that DMAE causes a noticeable boost in their ability to concentrate.

DMAE has been reported to offer the following benefits:

  • Alleviates the behavioral problems and hyperactivity associated with Attention Deficit Disorder (increases attention span, decreases aggression, improves learning ability and sometimes increases intelligence in 70% of ADD patients).
  • Inhibits and reverses the cross-linking of proteins and facilitates the removal of lipofuscin from neurons.
  • Decreases the incidence and severity of hangovers in people who consume excessive amounts of alcohol (subjects reported freedom from the depression or headaches associated with hangovers).
  • Increases the body’s production of energy.
  • People who use DMAE supplements report that after 3-4 weeks of DMAE use, they notice a continual mild stimulation of their CNS without side effects and a possible boost energy.
  • Alleviates anxiety (subjects administered 1,200 mg of DMAE per day for 5 days exhibited better control of anxious reactivity)
  • Increases assertiveness (subjects reported having a more outspoken personality).
  • Reduces apathy and increases motivation in persons afflicted with depression.
  • Improves creativity and verbal thinking (fluency).
  • Improves the behavior and mental function of children afflicted with Down’s Syndrome.
  • Exerts favorable effects on those chronic dyskinesias (including tardive dyskinesia) that occur as a result of long periods of major tranquilizers use.
  • Increases intelligence, improves learning and memory.(especially in children).Several studies have shown no memory benefit in senile dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease.
  • Elevates mood.
  • Reduces the amount of sleep required by about 1 hour per night, causes dreams to become more lucid (vivid), and users experience sounder sleep.
  • Increases daytime motivation and physical energy in persons afflicted with insomnia.
  • Increases willpower (subjects who previously were unable to stop smoking reported success).
  • Removes lipofuscin (age spots) from the skin.
  • Increases acetylcholine levels within the brain.

DMAE (brand names Deaner and Deanol) is sold in many health food stores. Recommended dosages start at 100 mg / day and extend up to 600 mg / day as needed. Clinical studies of DMAE have used up to 1,600 mg per day with no reports of side effects and is believed to be relatively nontoxic Overdosage can lead to insomnia, headaches, and muscle tension, but these effects should disappear when intake is lowered or stopped. No deficiencies of DMAE have been reported or are believed to occur. DMAE should not be used by epileptics or those with manic depression.

 


DMAE can help with the following

Aging  


Childhood  

Down's Syndrome

DMAE improves the behavior and mental function of children afflicted with Down’s Syndrome.



Hormones  


Immunity  

Chronic Fatigue / Fibromyalgia Syndrome

DMAE increases the body’s release of energy.



Mental  

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD / ADHD)

DMAE helps alleviate the behavioral problems and hyperactivity associated with ADD.



 

Depression

DMAE reduces apathy and increases motivation in persons afflicted with depression.



 

Anxiety

DMAE alleviates anxiety. In one study, subjects administered 1,200mg of DMAE per day for 5 days exhibited better control of anxious reactivity.



 


Metabolic  


 

Hangovers

DMAE decreases the incidence and severity of hangovers in people who consume excessive amounts of alcohol. Subjects in one study reported freedom from the depression or headaches associated with hangovers.



 

Insomnia

DMAE has been shown to increase daytime motivation and physical energy in persons afflicted with insomnia. As well as reducing the amount of sleep required by about 1 hour per night, users experience sounder sleep.



Nervous System  


Nutrients  


Key

May do some good
Likely to help
Highly recommended
May have adverse consequences
Avoid absolutely

Glossary

Antioxidant

A chemical compound that slows or prevents oxygen from reacting with other compounds. Some antioxidants have been shown to have cancer-protecting potential because they neutralize free radicals. Examples include vitamins C and E, alpha lipoic acid, beta carotene, the minerals selenium, zinc, and germanium, superoxide dismutase (SOD), coenzyme Q10, catalase, and some amino acids, like cystiene. Other nutrient sources include grape seed extract, curcumin, gingko, green tea, olive leaf, policosanol and pycnogenol.

Free Radical

A free radical is an atom or group of atoms that has at least one unpaired electron. Because another element can easily pick up this free electron and cause a chemical reaction, these free radicals can effect dramatic and destructive changes in the body. Free radicals are activated in heated and rancid oils and by radiation in the atmosphere, among other things.

Acetylcholine

A neurotransmitter widely distributed in body tissues with a primary function of mediating synaptic activity of the nervous system and skeletal muscles.

Neurotransmitters

Chemicals in the brain that aid in the transmission of nerve impulses. Various Neurotransmitters are responsible for different functions including controlling mood and muscle movement and inhibiting or causing the sensation of pain.

Protein

Compounds composed of hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen present in the body and in foods that form complex combinations of amino acids. Protein is essential for life and is used for growth and repair. Foods that supply the body with protein include animal products, grains, legumes, and vegetables. Proteins from animal sources contain the essential amino acids. Proteins are changed to amino acids in the body.

CNS

Central Nervous System.

Anxiety

Apprehension of danger, or dread, accompanied by nervous restlessness, tension, increased heart rate, and shortness of breath unrelated to a clearly identifiable stimulus.

Milligram

(mg): 1/1,000 of a gram by weight.

Chronic

Usually Chronic illness: Illness extending over a long period of time.

Dyskinesia

A condition characterized by spasmodic, uncoordinated, or other abnormal movements; i.e., those which result from a reaction to phenothiazines.

Dementia

An acquired progressive impairment of intellectual function. Marked compromise exists in at least three of the following mental activity spheres: memory, language, personality, visuospatial skills, and cognition (i.e., abstraction and calculation).

Alzheimer's Disease

A progressive disease of the middle-aged and elderly, characterized by loss of function and death of nerve cells in several areas of the brain, leading to loss of mental functions such as memory and learning. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia.

Age Spots

Also called "liver spots", these are flat, brown areas usually found on the face, hands, back and feet. They vary in size from 1/8 of an inch to several inches (0.3cm to several cm) and are associated with aging, but long-term sun exposure is also a major cause.

Bipolar Disorder

Also known as manic-depression, this disorder is characterized by alternating periods of extreme moods, usually swinging from being overly elated or irritable (mania) to sad and hopeless (depression) and then back again, with periods of normal mood in between. The frequency of the swings between these two states, and the duration of the mood, varies from person to person.

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