Cinnamon (Cinnamonum zeylanicum)

Research shows that cinnamon does more than just ward off diabetes and heart disease, it also makes you smarter. That’s what a recent study determined after administering cinnamon, both orally and nasally, to adults. Both “real” cinnamon and cinnamon flavored items, such as gum, were effective in enhancing the participants’ cognitive function.

Cinnamon also reportedly:

  • Supports digestive function
  • Constricts and tones tissues
  • Relieves congestion
  • Alleviates pain, inflammation, and stiffness of muscles and joints
  • Eases menstrual discomfort
  • Stimulates circulation
  • Kills bacteria, including E.coli. In fact, it was used as a preservative of meats and other foods before refrigeration.

Alan Hirsch, M.D., at the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago reports that cinnamon has scored high as an aphrodisiac for males.

 


Cinnamon (Cinnamonum zeylanicum) can help with the following

Aging  

Alzheimer's Disease

Michael Ovadia, from Tel Aviv University (Israel), and colleagues isolated CEppt, an extract found in cinnamon bark, and introduced the substance into the drinking water of mice that had been genetically altered to develop an aggressive form of Alzheimer’s disease, and fruit flies that had been mutated with a human gene that also stimulated Alzheimer’s disease and shortened their lifespan.

After four months, the researchers discovered that development of the disease had slowed remarkably and the animals’ activity levels and longevity were comparable to that of their healthy counterparts. The extract inhibited the formation of toxic amyloid polypeptide oligomers and fibrils, which compose deposits of plaque found in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. In a test-tube study, CEppt was also found to break up amyloid fibers, similar to those seen in Alzheimer’s patients.

Noting that CEppt caused a “reduction of plaques and improvement in cognitive behavior,” the team concludes that: “Our results present a novel prophylactic approach for inhibition of toxic oligomeric A[beta] species formation in [Alzheimer’s Disease] through the utilization of a compound that is currently in use in human diet.”

A problem remains with the quantity of cinnamon one would need to consume to benefit from its anti-Alzheimer’s properties. “Raw cinnamon also contains substances harmful to the liver,” says Ovadia. “Whereas one may consume six to ten grams per day without damaging the liver, to reap the substance’s medicinal benefits, one would have to consume tens of grams per day at least, which starts to become dangerous. For this reason we developed a means of extracting the active substance from the cinnamon and separating it from the toxic substances.” [Frydman-Marom A, Levin A, Farfara D, Benromano T, Scherzer-Attali R, et al. (2011) Orally Administrated Cinnamon Extract Reduces ß-Amyloid Oligomerization and Corrects Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer’s Disease Animal Models. PLoS ONE 6(1): e16564. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0016564]

This extract is not currently available for consumer use.



Circulation  


Digestion  


Hormones  

Elevated Insulin Levels

Cinnamon with each meal helps keep insulin and blood sugar levels under control. The typical 1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon dose contains a phytochemical called methyl hydroxy chalcone polymer (MHCP) which improves cellular glucose utilization and increases the sensitivity of insulin receptors in laboratory studies. Personal testimonies indicate that this effect is seen in humans, but further study is required to confirm this.



 


Mental  


Musculo-Skeletal  


 


Organ Health  

Increased Risk of Diabetes ll

A US Department of Agriculture study of 60 type 2 diabetics revealed that one gram of cinnamon taken daily, over a

course of 40 days, improved management of blood sugar levels, as well as triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Some

of the subjects took three grams of cinnamon per day, and others took six grams per day, but none of the subjects in

these two groups showed an increased benefit over the group that took one gram per day. One gram of cinnamon is less than half a teaspoon.

Researchers continued to monitor the study participants after the 40-day trial, and found that the subjects’ overall

blood sugar levels began rising when the cinnamon intake was discontinued.

Cinnamon not only lowers blood glucose levels if you eat if for at least 6 weeks but it keeps lowering your fasting glucose levels for 20 days after that. The cinnamon spice that works is the common form of powder found in every grocery

store and kitchen, and the cinnamon pills but not the cinnamon oil.

Prior to 2003, researchers believed that the active ingredient in cinnamon that lowered blood sugar was a compound called

“methylhydroxychalcone polymer” or MHCP. Predictably, companies rushed to a sell MHCP pills. However, one of the

original cinnamon study’s researchers (Dr. Richard Anerdson of the a US Department of Agriculture affliated lab, conducted a further study in 2004 which showed that MHCP was in fact not the active ingredient producing the beneficial effects on blood sugar. The true active agent that gives cinnamon its power to lower blood sugar and cholesterol is “polyphenol type-A polymer”.



 

Diabetes Type II

A US Department of Agriculture study of 60 type 2 diabetics revealed that one gram of cinnamon taken daily, over a

course of 40 days, improved management of blood sugar levels, as well as triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Some

of the subjects took three grams of cinnamon per day, and others took six grams per day, but none of the subjects in

these two groups showed an increased benefit over the group that took one gram per day. One gram of cinnamon is less than half a teaspoon.

Researchers continued to monitor the study participants after the 40-day trial, and found that the subjects’ overall

blood sugar levels began rising when the cinnamon intake was discontinued.

Cinnamon not only lowers blood glucose levels if you eat if for at least 6 weeks but it keeps lowering your fasting glucose levels for 20 days after that. The cinnamon spice that works is the common form of powder found in every grocery

store and kitchen, and the cinnamon pills but not the cinnamon oil.

Prior to 2003, researchers believed that the active ingredient in cinnamon that lowered blood sugar was a compound called

“methylhydroxychalcone polymer” or MHCP. Predictably, companies rushed to a sell MHCP pills. However, one of the

original cinnamon study’s researchers (Dr. Richard Anerdson of the a US Department of Agriculture affliated lab, conducted a further study in 2004 which showed that MHCP was in fact not the active ingredient producing the beneficial effects on blood sugar. The true active agent that gives cinnamon its power to lower blood sugar and cholesterol is “polyphenol type-A polymer”.



Risks  

Increased Risk of Alzheimer's / Dementia

Michael Ovadia, from Tel Aviv University (Israel), and colleagues isolated CEppt, an extract found in cinnamon bark, and introduced the substance into the drinking water of mice that had been genetically altered to develop an aggressive form of Alzheimer’s disease, and fruit flies that had been mutated with a human gene that also stimulated Alzheimer’s disease and shortened their lifespan.

After four months, the researchers discovered that development of the disease had slowed remarkably and the animals’ activity levels and longevity were comparable to that of their healthy counterparts. The extract inhibited the formation of toxic amyloid polypeptide oligomers and fibrils, which compose deposits of plaque found in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. In a test-tube study, Ceppt was also found to break up amyloid fibers, similar to those seen in Alzheimer’s patients.

Noting that Ceppt caused a “reduction of plaques and improvement in cognitive behavior,” the team concludes that: “Our results present a novel prophylactic approach for inhibition of toxic oligomeric A[beta] species formation in [Alzheimer’s Disease] through the utilization of a compound that is currently in use in human diet.”

A problem remains with the quantity of cinnamon one would need to consume to benefit from its anti-Alzheimer’s properties. “Raw cinnamon also contains substances harmful to the liver,” says Ovadia. “Whereas one may consume six to ten grams per day without damaging the liver, to reap the substance’s medicinal benefits, one would have to consume tens of grams per day at least, which starts to become dangerous. For this reason we developed a means of extracting the active substance from the cinnamon and separating it from the toxic substances.” [Frydman-Marom A, Levin A, Farfara D, Benromano T, Scherzer-Attali R, et al. (2011) Orally Administrated Cinnamon Extract Reduces ß-Amyloid Oligomerization and Corrects Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer’s Disease Animal Models. PLoS ONE 6(1): e16564. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0016564]

This extract is not currently available for consumer use.



Skin-Hair-Nails  

Cold Hands and Feet

Cinnamon is warming and improves circulation, so is good to take if you suffer cold hands and feet.



Uro-Genital  


Key

May do some good
Likely to help

Glossary

Diabetes Mellitus

A disease with increased blood glucose levels due to lack or ineffectiveness of insulin. Diabetes is found in two forms; insulin-dependent diabetes (juvenile-onset) and non-insulin-dependent (adult-onset). Symptoms include increased thirst; increased urination; weight loss in spite of increased appetite; fatigue; nausea; vomiting; frequent infections including bladder, vaginal, and skin; blurred vision; impotence in men; bad breath; cessation of menses; diminished skin fullness. Other symptoms include bleeding gums; ear noise/buzzing; diarrhea; depression; confusion.

Bacteria

Microscopic germs. Some bacteria are "harmful" and can cause disease, while other "friendly" bacteria protect the body from harmful invading organisms.

Aphrodisiac

Substance increasing or arousing sexual desire.

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