Rapid Stomach Emptying (Gastric Dumping)

Rapid gastric emptying, or dumping syndrome, happens when the lower end of the small intestine (jejunum) fills too quickly with undigested food from the stomach. “Early” dumping begins during or right after a meal. Symptoms of early dumping include nausea, vomiting, bloating, diarrhea, and shortness of breath. Some people may have both early dumping and delayed gastric emptying due to gastric rhythm disturbances.

Certain types of stomach surgery that allow the stomach to empty rapidly are the main cause of dumping syndrome. Patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome may also have dumping syndrome. (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is a rare disorder involving extreme peptic ulcer disease and gastrin-secreting tumors in the pancreas.)

Doctors diagnose dumping syndrome primarily on the basis of symptoms in patients who have had gastric surgery that causes the syndrome. Tests may be needed to exclude other conditions that have similar symptoms.

Treatment includes changes in eating habits and medication. People who have dumping syndrome need to eat several small meals a day that are low in carbohydrates and should drink liquids between meals, not with them. People with severe cases take medicine to slow their digestion.

 


Signs, symptoms & indicators of Rapid Stomach Emptying (Gastric Dumping)

Symptoms - Bowel Movements  

Undigested food in stools




Conditions that suggest Rapid Stomach Emptying (Gastric Dumping)

Symptoms - Gas-Int - General  

(Possible) gastric dumping



Counter Indicators
Symptoms - Gas-Int - General  

Absence of gastric dumping




Recommendations for Rapid Stomach Emptying (Gastric Dumping)

Lab Tests/Rule-Outs  

Test for Helicobacter Pylori Infection

The most common cause of stomach polyps is chronic gastritis. Persistent irritation of the stomach lining triggers excessive growth of normal cells (hyperplasia). If the gastritis is a result of long term H.pylori infection, successful eradication and appropriate treatment of H.pylori gastritis may lead to the polyp resolving spontaneously.



Key

Strong or generally accepted link
Proven definite or direct link
Very strongly or absolutely counter-indicative
Likely to help

Glossary

Jejunum

The lower end of the small intestine.

Stomach

A hollow, muscular, J-shaped pouch located in the upper part of the abdomen to the left of the midline. The upper end (fundus) is large and dome-shaped; the area just below the fundus is called the body of the stomach. The fundus and the body are often referred to as the cardiac portion of the stomach. The lower (pyloric) portion curves downward and to the right and includes the antrum and the pylorus. The function of the stomach is to begin digestion by physically breaking down food received from the esophagus. The tissues of the stomach wall are composed of three types of muscle fibers: circular, longitudinal and oblique. These fibers create structural elasticity and contractibility, both of which are needed for digestion. The stomach mucosa contains cells which secrete hydrochloric acid and this in turn activates the other gastric enzymes pepsin and rennin. To protect itself from being destroyed by its own enzymes, the stomach’s mucous lining must constantly regenerate itself.

Nausea

Symptoms resulting from an inclination to vomit.

Diarrhea

Excessive discharge of contents of bowel.

Peptic Ulcer

A general term for gastric ulcers (stomach) and duodenal ulcers (duodenum), open sores in the stomach or duodenum caused by digestive juices and stomach acid. Most ulcers are no larger than a pencil eraser, but they can cause tremendous discomfort and pain. They occur most frequently in the 60 to 70 age group, and slightly more often in men than in women. Doctors now know that there are two major causes of ulcers: most often patients are infected with the bacteria Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori); others are regular users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), which include common products like aspirin and ibuprofen.

Carbohydrates

The sugars and starches in food. Sugars are called simple carbohydrates and found in such foods as fruit and table sugar. Complex carbohydrates are composed of large numbers of sugar molecules joined together, and are found in grains, legumes, and vegetables like potatoes, squash, and corn.

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