Endometrial Cancer

Endometrial cancer is one of the most common cancers in American women. It is the fourth most common cancer found in women — after breast, lung and colon cancer. Endometrial cancer usually begins in the lining of the uterus, called the endometrium. Endometrial cancer most often occurs after the reproductive years, between the ages of 60 and 70. Endometrial cancer is sometimes called uterine cancer, but there are other cells in the uterus that can become cancerous as well. These form much less common cancers called sarcomas and account for less than 5% of uterine cancers.

Endometrial cancer is often detected at an early stage because it frequently produces vaginal bleeding between menstrual periods or after menopause. If discovered early, this slow-growing cancer is likely to be confined to the uterus. Removing the uterus surgically often eliminates the cancer. In fact, stage I endometrial cancer is successfully treated more than 90 percent of the time. Unfortunately, not everyone can be successfully treated because the cancer may have spread beyond the uterus at the time of diagnosis.

 


Conditions that suggest Endometrial Cancer

Uro-Genital  



Risk factors for Endometrial Cancer

Hormones  

Low Melatonin Level

A 1998 report found an extraordinarily strong correlation between melatonin level and endometrial cancer. Women were selected who appeared that they might have endometrial cancer. The women who in fact did not have endometrial cancer had an average melatonin level of 33. The women who had endometrial cancer had an average melatonin level of 6. There was little overlap between groups – by using melatonin levels alone, 94% of the patients could have been correctly categorized. A 1992 report proposed that decreased melatonin levels could contribute to endometrial cancer.



Symptoms - Reproductive - Female Cycle  

Postmenopausal bleeding

The most common sign of endometrial cancer is unusual bleeding from the vagina, especially bleeding that occurs after passing through menopause.



Counter Indicators
Symptoms - Reproductive - Female Cycle  

Total/radical hysterectomy or hysterectomy with one ovary or hysterectomy with both ovaries




Endometrial Cancer suggests the following may be present

Hormones  

Low Melatonin Level

A 1998 report found an extraordinarily strong correlation between melatonin level and endometrial cancer. Women were selected who appeared that they might have endometrial cancer. The women who in fact did not have endometrial cancer had an average melatonin level of 33. The women who had endometrial cancer had an average melatonin level of 6. There was little overlap between groups – by using melatonin levels alone, 94% of the patients could have been correctly categorized. A 1992 report proposed that decreased melatonin levels could contribute to endometrial cancer.




Endometrial Cancer can lead to

Uro-Genital  



Recommendations for Endometrial Cancer

Botanical  

Maca (Lepidium meyenii)

Women with endometrial cancer should avoid this herb because of possible negative hormonal influences.



Key

Weak or unproven link
Strong or generally accepted link
Proven definite or direct link
Very strongly or absolutely counter-indicative
Reasonably likely to cause problems

Glossary

Cancer

Refers to the various types of malignant neoplasms that contain cells growing out of control and invading adjacent tissues, which may metastasize to distant tissues.

Colon

The part of the large intestine that extends to the rectum. The colon takes the contents of the small intestine, moving them to the rectum by contracting.

Menopause

The cessation of menstruation (usually not official until 12 months have passed without periods), occurring at the average age of 52. As commonly used, the word denotes the time of a woman's life, usually between the ages of 45 and 54, when periods cease and any symptoms of low estrogen levels persist, including hot flashes, insomnia, anxiety, mood swings, loss of libido and vaginal dryness. When these early menopausal symptoms subside, a woman becomes postmenopausal.

Melatonin

The only hormone secreted into the bloodstream by the pineal gland. The hormone appears to inhibit numerous endocrine functions, including the gonadotropic hormones. Research exists on the efficacy of melatonin in treating jet lag and certain sleep disorders. Dosages greater than l milligram have been associated with drowsiness, headaches, disturbances in sleep/wake cycles and is contraindicated in those who are on antidepressive medication. It also negatively influences insulin utilization.

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