The Analyst™

Comprehensive diagnosis of your symptoms

Healthy

  Molybdenum  
 
Search treatments and conditions

 

Molybdenum may be useful in the treatment of certain cardiovascular conditions, asthma, allergies and mercury toxicity. Because of its involvement with sulfur, it may be warranted for use in cases of asthma that are associated with sulfite sensitivity. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency has been identified in a large number of patients. A diet low in sulfur amino acids can be therapeutic. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency results in the loss of 2 molybdenum-dependent enzymes, namely sulfate oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase. Molybdenum also inhibits the intestinal absorption of copper and iron. It may be wise to balance molybdenum supplementation with copper supplements.

Molybdenum by IV administration stimulates sulfite metabolism but it is not as effective when taken orally and therefore oral use should be with the most effective chelates available, such as molybdenum picolinate at 1-3mg per day.

Sulfites in the urine are indicative of molybdenum need. Urine sulfite dipsticks are available from Meridian Valley Laboratory which can be found on our links page.
 

 
 

Molybdenum can help with the following:
 
 
Environment / Toxicity  Copper Toxicity
 Since high levels of copper in the body or diet may result in molybdenum insufficiency and cause low uric acid levels, reducing copper toxicity can result in normalizing uric acid and molybdenum levels. Intake of molybdenum at doses as low as 0.54mg per day has been associated with an increased loss of copper in the urine.

  Mercury Toxicity / Amalgam Illness
 Molybdenum may be useful in the treatment of certain cardiovascular conditions, asthma, allergies and mercury toxicity.

Infections

  Yeast / Candida
 Acetaldehyde, a toxic byproduct of alcohol use or an overgrowth of Candida, can be converted into acetic acid in the presence of molybdenum and then removed from the body provided there is adequate molybdenum in the diet or through supplementation. Several doctors have reported improved detoxification and increased energy with the use of 100mcg of molybdenum TID for at least 4 months.

Lab Values

  Uric Acid Levels Low
 Uric acid levels can be raised with supplemental molybdenum. While taking molybdenum orally may raise uric acid levels, IV administration may be required in some cases. Further evidence of an interaction comes from a study of men who consumed 10 to 15mg of molybdenum per day for prolonged periods who then developed high serum uric acid levels.

Metabolic

  Sulfite Sensitivity
 Molybdenum may be warranted for use in asthma or other symptoms associated with sulfite sensitivity because of its involvement with sulfur. Molybdenum deficiency may be responsible for sulfite sensitivity since it is a cofactor for sulfite oxidase. Sulfite oxidase catalyzes the last step (sulfites to sulfates) in the breakdown of sulfur amino acids. It may be wise to balance molybdenum supplementation with copper supplements, since one can cause a deficiency of the other.

Sulfites in the urine are indicative of molybdenum need. Urine sulfite dipsticks are available from Meridian Valley Laboratory.

Molybdenum by IV administration stimulates sulfite metabolism but it is not very effective orally; oral use should therefore be with the most effective chelates available, such as molybdenum picolinate at 1-3mg per day.

Musculo-Skeletal

  Joint Pain, General
 See the link between Low Back Pain and Molybdenum.


Not recommended for:
  Gout / Hyperuricemia
 Molybdenum is known to raise uric acid levels which is why people with gout (a condition of elevated uric acid levels) are told to avoid molybdenum supplements.

Nutrients

  Molybdenum Need

Pain

  Low Back Pain / Problems
 Margaret Moss, MA found that taking oral molybdenum over a 28-day period produces a "statistically significant improvement" in patients with arthritis and other aches and pains as well as in their general health. Moss monitored
14 middle-aged people with symptoms of arthritis, low back pain, frozen shoulder, rheumatoid and osteoarthritis, as they took 400 to 500mcg daily (in 4 or 5 doses of 100mcg) of molybdenum amino acid chelate.

Respiratory

  Asthma
 Molybdenum may be useful in the treatment of certain cardiovascular conditions, asthma, allergies and mercury toxicity. Because of its involvement with sulfur, it may be warranted to use in asthma that is associated with sulfite sensitivity.
 
 


KEY
May do some good
Likely to help
Highly recommended
Reasonably likely to cause problems
 
You know your mind is renewed when the impossible looks logical. ~Bill Johnson






GLOSSARY

Allergy:  Hypersensitivity caused by exposure to a particular antigen (allergen), resulting in an increased reactivity to that antigen on subsequent exposure, sometimes with harmful immunologic consequences.

Asthma:  A lung disorder marked by attacks of breathing difficulty, wheezing, coughing, and thick mucus coming from the lungs. The episodes may be triggered by breathing foreign substances (allergens) or pollutants, infection, vigorous exercise, or emotional stress.

Cardiovascular:  Pertaining to the heart and blood vessels.

Cofactor:  A substance that acts with another substance to bring about certain effects, often a coenzyme.

Copper:  An essential mineral that is a component of several important enzymes in the body and is essential to good health. Copper is found in all body tissues. Copper deficiency leads to a variety of abnormalities, including anemia, skeletal defects, degeneration of the nervous system, reproductive failure, pronounced cardiovascular lesions, elevated blood cholesterol, impaired immunity and defects in the pigmentation and structure of hair. Copper is involved in iron incorporation into hemoglobin. It is also involved with vitamin C in the formation of collagen and the proper functioning in central nervous system. More than a dozen enzymes have been found to contain copper. The best studied are superoxide dismutase (SOD), cytochrome C oxidase, catalase, dopamine hydroxylase, uricase, tryptophan dioxygenase, lecithinase and other monoamine and diamine oxidases.

Enzymes:  Specific protein catalysts produced by the cells that are crucial in chemical reactions and in building up or synthesizing most compounds in the body. Each enzyme performs a specific function without itself being consumed. For example, the digestive enzyme amylase acts on carbohydrates in foods to break them down.

Intravenous Infusion:  (IV): A small needle placed in the vein to assist in fluid replacement or the giving of medication.

Iron:  An essential mineral. Prevents anemia: as a constituent of hemoglobin, transports oxygen throughout the body. Virtually all of the oxygen used by cells in the life process are brought to the cells by the hemoglobin of red blood cells. Iron is a small but most vital, component of the hemoglobin in 20,000 billion red blood cells, of which 115 million are formed every minute. Heme iron (from meat) is absorbed 10 times more readily than the ferrous or ferric form.

Metabolism:  The chemical processes of living cells in which energy is produced in order to replace and repair tissues and maintain a healthy body. Responsible for the production of energy, biosynthesis of important substances, and degradation of various compounds.

Milligram:  (mg): 1/1,000 of a gram by weight.

Molybdenum:  An essential trace element. It helps regulate iron stores in the body and is a key component of at least three enzymes: xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase and sulfite oxidase. These enzymes are involved with carbohydrate metabolism, fat oxidation and urine metabolism. The average adult has about 9mg of molybdenum concentrated mostly in the liver, kidney, adrenal glands, bones and skin. Molybdenum deficiencies are associated with esophageal cancer, sexual impotency and tooth decay.

Sulfite Sensitivity:  A person can develop sulfite sensitivity (allergy) at any point in their life but the cause is often unknown. Sulfites are sulfur-based compounds that are added by food manufacturers and restaurants for many purposes such as reducing discoloration of light-colored fruits and vegetables; preventing black spots on seafood; inhibiting the growth of microorganisms in fermented foods such as wine; conditioning dough; maintaining the stability and potency of certain medications. The most common symptom is difficulty in breathing. Sulfites give off the gas sulfur dioxide, which can cause irritation in the lungs and cause a severe asthma attack for those who suffer from asthma. Responses vary; sulfites can also cause chest tightness, nausea, hives, or even anaphylactic shock.