The Analyst™

Comprehensive diagnosis of your symptoms

Healthy

  Sunlight / Light Exposure  
 
Search treatments and conditions

 

Vitamin D is manufactured in the skin following direct exposure to sunlight. The amount of vitamin D produced in the skin varies depending on time of day, season, latitude and skin pigmentation. Usually 10-15 minutes exposure of hands, arms and face two to three times per week (depending on one's skin sensitivity) is enough to satisfy the body's vitamin D requirement. Use of sunscreen markedly diminishes the manufacture of vitamin D in the skin, as do window glass, clothing and air pollution. The fairer your skin color, the more vitamin D you make. As adults age, the ability to make vitamin D through the skin decreases. People who are housebound and experience no sunlight exposure are unable to make vitamin D.

A book, The UV Advantage is an important read for anyone interested in preventing numerous health problems and bettering their health. According to Dr. Holick, “The notion that we have to protect ourselves from the sun all the time is misguided and unhealthy.”
 

 
 

Sunlight / Light Exposure can help with the following:
 
 
Aging  Senile Dementia
 (Sunderland, England - 2008)—In what is being called a scientific "breakthrough," ScienceDaily reports that researchers at the University of Sunderland have shown that "regular exposure to safe low level infra-red light can improve learning performance and kick-start the cognitive function of the brain."

According to the report, experts claim that early stage dementia patients should see an improvement in their cognitive function within four weeks, by wearing a lightweight helmet in their home for just ten minutes a day.

Dr Gordon Dougal reportedly came up with the idea after the light proved effective in the treatment of cold sores. Said Dougal: "The implications of this research at the University of Sunderland are enormous...Currently all you can do with dementia is to slow down the rate of decay. This new process will not only stop that rate of decay but partially reverse it."

  Senior Issues
 Living longer can be as simple as living on a tree-lined street or near a park, according to a study of over 3,000 people in Tokyo. Among older participants, women were more likely to survive than men, both men and women were more likely to survive when they lived near trees and grassy walking areas. Researchers speculate that seniors who live near these types of areas are more likely take walks outside, which may contribute to an increased physical state.

Additionally, women were more likely to survive when they had social relationships with neighbors. Men were less likely to survive when they lived in noisy areas crowded with factories. Moreover, the longer the sun filled a home, the longer men tended to live. Women did not seem to be influenced by this, however. [Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health December 2002;56:913-918]

Environment / Toxicity

  Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
 Apart from getting more light, either artificial or natural, here is a light source that may help.

ScienceDaily (Nov. 14, 2007) — Scientists at John Carroll University, working in its Lighting Innovations Institute, have developed an affordable accessory that appears to reduce the symptoms of ADHD. Their discovery also has also been shown to improve sleep patterns among people who have difficulty falling asleep. The John Carroll researchers have created glasses designed to block blue light, therefore altering a person's circadian rhythm, which leads to improvement in ADHD symptoms and sleep disorders.

How the Glasses Work

The individual puts on the glasses a couple of hours ahead of bedtime, advancing the circadian rhythm. The special glasses block the blue rays that cause a delay in the start of the flow of melatonin, the sleep hormone. Normally, melatonin flow doesn't begin until after the individual goes into darkness.

Studies indicate that promoting the earlier release of melatonin results in a marked decline of ADHD symptoms. Major uses of the blue-blocking glasses include: providing better sleep, avoiding postpartum depression, preventing Seasonal Affective Disorder and reducing the risk of cancer.

An alternative to the glasses has also been developed in the form of night lights and light bulbs with coatings that block the blue light. Instead of wearing the glasses, an individual may simply turn off ordinary lights and, instead, turn on the ones with filters that remove the blue rays. The night light is a convenient "plug-in" device. The cost of the items ranges from approximately $5 for light bulbs and night lights to $40-$60 for glasses.

Hormones

  Low Serotonin Level
 Serotonin, the brain hormone associated with mood elevation, rises with exposure to bright light, and falls with decreased sun exposure. This has been proven by many scientific studies, including one reported in the well-respected medical journal Lancet in 2002. This study measured blood levels of serotonin, finding that production of serotonin by the brain was directly related to the duration of bright sunlight.

Mental

  Tendency Toward Postpartum Depression
 ScienceDaily (Nov. 14, 2007) — Scientists at John Carroll University, working in its Lighting Innovations Institute, have developed an affordable accessory that appears to reduce the symptoms of ADHD. Their discovery also has also been shown to improve sleep patterns among people who have difficulty falling asleep. The John Carroll researchers have created glasses designed to block blue light, therefore altering a person's circadian rhythm, which leads to improvement in ADHD symptoms and sleep disorders.

How the Glasses Work

The individual puts on the glasses a couple of hours ahead of bedtime, advancing the circadian rhythm. The special glasses block the blue rays that cause a delay in the start of the flow of melatonin, the sleep hormone. Normally, melatonin flow doesn't begin until after the individual goes into darkness.

Studies indicate that promoting the earlier release of melatonin results in a marked decline of ADHD symptoms. Major uses of the blue-blocking glasses include: providing better sleep, avoiding postpartum depression, preventing Seasonal Affective Disorder and reducing the risk of cancer.

An alternative to the glasses has also been developed in the form of night lights and light bulbs with coatings that block the blue light. Instead of wearing the glasses, an individual may simply turn off ordinary lights and, instead, turn on the ones with filters that remove the blue rays. The night light is a convenient "plug-in" device. The cost of the items ranges from approximately $5 for light bulbs and night lights to $40-$60 for glasses.

  Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD / ADHD)
 ScienceDaily (Nov. 14, 2007) — Scientists at John Carroll University, working in its Lighting Innovations Institute, have developed an affordable accessory that appears to reduce the symptoms of ADHD. Their discovery also has also been shown to improve sleep patterns among people who have difficulty falling asleep. The John Carroll researchers have created glasses designed to block blue light, therefore altering a person's circadian rhythm, which leads to improvement in ADHD symptoms and sleep disorders.

How the Glasses Work

The individual puts on the glasses a couple of hours ahead of bedtime, advancing the circadian rhythm. The special glasses block the blue rays that cause a delay in the start of the flow of melatonin, the sleep hormone. Normally, melatonin flow doesn't begin until after the individual goes into darkness.

Studies indicate that promoting the earlier release of melatonin results in a marked decline of ADHD symptoms. Major uses of the blue-blocking glasses include: providing better sleep, avoiding postpartum depression, preventing Seasonal Affective Disorder and reducing the risk of cancer.

An alternative to the glasses has also been developed in the form of night lights and light bulbs with coatings that block the blue light. Instead of wearing the glasses, an individual may simply turn off ordinary lights and, instead, turn on the ones with filters that remove the blue rays. The night light is a convenient "plug-in" device. The cost of the items ranges from approximately $5 for light bulbs and night lights to $40-$60 for glasses.

  Panic Attacks
 A study found that 9 of 22 patients had panic attacks more frequently in winter.

Metabolic

  Bulimic Tendency
  Insomnia
 ScienceDaily (Nov. 14, 2007) — Scientists at John Carroll University, working in its Lighting Innovations Institute, have developed an affordable accessory that appears to reduce the symptoms of ADHD. Their discovery also has also been shown to improve sleep patterns among people who have difficulty falling asleep. The John Carroll researchers have created glasses designed to block blue light, therefore altering a person's circadian rhythm, which leads to improvement in ADHD symptoms and sleep disorders.

How the Glasses Work

The individual puts on the glasses a couple of hours ahead of bedtime, advancing the circadian rhythm. The special glasses block the blue rays that cause a delay in the start of the flow of melatonin, the sleep hormone. Normally, melatonin flow doesn't begin until after the individual goes into darkness.

Studies indicate that promoting the earlier release of melatonin results in a marked decline of ADHD symptoms. Major uses of the blue-blocking glasses include: providing better sleep, avoiding postpartum depression, preventing Seasonal Affective Disorder and reducing the risk of cancer.

An alternative to the glasses has also been developed in the form of night lights and light bulbs with coatings that block the blue light. Instead of wearing the glasses, an individual may simply turn off ordinary lights and, instead, turn on the ones with filters that remove the blue rays. The night light is a convenient "plug-in" device. The cost of the items ranges from approximately $5 for light bulbs and night lights to $40-$60 for glasses.

Musculo-Skeletal

  Osteoporosis / Risk

Nutrients

  Vitamin D Requirement

Risks

  Cancer / Risk - General Measures
 Please see the link between Cancer / Risk Reduction and Vitamin D.

  Increased Risk of Ovarian Cancer
 Vitamin D metabolite receptors are found on endocrine and reproductive organs and are known to play a role in inhibiting a number of cancer cell lines. The incidence of ovarian cancer varies with latitude, with higher rates in northern parts of the world. In this study, the quantity of sunlight was strongly inversely correlated with the incidence of death due to ovarian cancer in 100 of the largest US cities (1979-88) after adjustments were made for air pollution levels. Northern women in the 5th decade of life were found to have 5 times the mortality rate from ovarian cancer as southern women. [Epidemiol 23 (6): pp.1133-36, 1994]

Skin-Hair-Nails

  Adult Acne
 In the first study of its kind, conducted at Hammersmith Hospital, Dr Chu et al. evaluated the use of a mixed blue and red light (peaks at 415nm and 660nm) in the treatment of acne vulgaris. 107 subjects were randomised into four treatment groups. 1. Blue light. 2. Cool white light (placebo) 3. 5% benzoyl peroxide 4. Mixed blue and red light.

Treatment consisted of 15-minute irradiation in front of a portable light unit each day. (With the exact, special spec, tubes utilised by BeautySkin).

The red/blue mix had significantly better results than the other treatment groups. Improvements were clearly noticeable after only 4 weeks. After 12 weeks, the blue/red treatment achieved a mean improvement of 76% in inflammatory lesions and a mean improvement in comedones of 58%, which exceeded any of the other treatments.

The researchers concluded "We propose that blue light and red light acts synergistically in improving acne by combining anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory action, rendering phototherapy with blue-red light an effective and safe treatment for acne vulgaris". [British Journal of Dermatology, 142: 5. Pp 973-978]

Light treatments using these wavelengths of light are being offered at some clinics. It is also now possible to purchase your own lightbox for treating acne at home.

  Psoriasis
 Summer sun is the best source of ultra-violet light, and many people find psoriasis settles very well in summer. Treatment in winter can be aided by artificial lamps: smaller lamps are usually not strong enough, but impulse type lamps, wall mounted "fluorescent lamp type" lamps, and larger "solarium" lamps are suitable. Unfortunately, some psoriasis sufferers are rather sensitive to sun light, and may not be improved with this treatment.

It is usually best to apply a tar or drithanol preparation daily, to be followed later by ultra-violet light treatment.
 
 


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