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  Nanobacteria Infection  
 
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Conditions that suggest it | Contributing risk factors | It can lead to... | Recommendations

 

Baylor scientists and others have searched for years to prove that a virus or other infection might explain why some get severe heart disease and others get none. A breakthrough in Finland, by Nobel Prize nominees Neva Ciftcioglu PhD and Olavi Kajander MD, PhD, has opened the door to a stunningly successful treatment program, now available locally. Their discovery was an unsuspected, incredibly tiny bacterium-called Nanobacter-that appears to cause or worsen a variety of ailments, including heart disease. These tiny bacteria, seen only with powerful electron microscopes, "ooze" a protective shell of calcium, coating themselves just like the sugar glaze on a donut. When enough Nanobacter are present, specks of calcification appear and grow-hardening arteries, creating kidney stones, perhaps even cataracts and gum disease. Research is now underway at Mayo Clinic, Harvard, NASA, and other centers around the world.

Preliminary treatment trials have shown, within 6 months, decreases of 50% in heart artery calcifications, with dramatic improvements in symptoms, EKG tracings, and other tests. Also noted were better memory, more energy, return of sexual function, better physical performance, improved vision, even better hearing. Researchers saw lessening angina heart pains, lower blood pressure, better diabetes control, better circulation overall, even improvement in arthritis joint pains.

John Parks Trowbridge M.D., specialist in alternative approaches for over 20 years, sees this discovery as an exciting new choice in health care. Rather than just treating disease, people can choose to restore better health, reduce use of drugs dramatically, even avoid risks of surgery and hospital tests.

"Nanobacter treatment," explains Trowbridge, "is one of the last pieces in the puzzle of not just treating but even preventing heart disease, perhaps high blood pressure, and a whole host of other "degenerative" long-lasting diseases." Head of the Advanced Training Program in Heavy Metal Toxicology in 1996-1998 and a Fellow of the American College for Advancement in Medicine, Dr. Trowbridge pioneered development of an advanced chelation therapy program since 1993. "Nanobacter treatment," explains this author of 7 books including 3 on chelation as an effective method to remove unsuspected toxic metals contributing to heart and blood vessel diseases, "adds a dramatic new dimension to our efforts to return people to active, independent living."

Trowbridge has completed extensive revisions to incorporate Nanobacter treatment into his already advanced protocols. "Doctors without sufficient background in nutrition and toxic metal removal run the risk of needlessly creating new problems while trying to solve others," he cautions. "Our 20 years of experience produce safe and consistent results ...and adding treatments for the Nanobacter infections will be even more successful in meeting people's needs more quickly and with less expense, with the convenience that most of the treatment is done at home."

Finally feeling better, according to Dr. Trowbridge, has never been easier and never been more affordable. Insurance companies, he claims, have ignored many advances that help restore better health, programs that people would demand if they knew the real facts. "One reason that our advanced programs, and now Nanobacter treatments as well, are so wonderful is that they treat the causes of many problems, not just the discomforts.

People who come for help with 'heart disease' often brag about better digestion, fewer prostate problems or menopausal hot flashes, better sleep, fewer headaches, better skin tone, and on and on. We're thrilled to share in their successes and looking to help other who want the same."

This concept is highly controversial and may yet prove to be inaccurate. Further studies are needed.
 

 
 

Conditions that suggest Nanobacteria Infection:
 
 
Autoimmune  Scleroderma
 Researchers have identified tiny bacteria, known as nanobacteria, that may play a role in the formation of calcification found in scleroderma and other disorders. Cells infected by these bacteria develop deposits of the mineral apatite on their walls.

This is a very new field of research which is highly controversial, however it has recently attracted the attention of researchers at the Mayo Clinic and NASA. Nanobacteria have been found in kidney stones, Alzheimer's disease, heart disease, prostatitis, and some cancers.

A lot of the controversy surrounding nanobacteria has to do with its very name, in that some researchers do not believe that it represents a life form and thus cannot properly be named "bacteria", because the research on its purported nucleic acid has not been completed yet. Thus, some believe that "nanoparticles" would be a better description for it.

Circulation

  Atherosclerosis

Organ Health

  Kidney Stones (Urolithiasis)
 Tiny little bacteria that build a mineral shell for themselves could be the cause of kidney stones, Finnish researchers recently discovered. They said they found the bacteria, known as nanobacteria because of their small size, in human blood serum and also in kidney stones.

``Nanobacteria are the smallest cell-walled bacteria, only recently discovered in human and cow blood and commercial cell culture serum,'' they wrote in their report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. They found nanobacteria in both human and cow serum. When they let the serum sit in a test tube for a little while, the bacteria settled on the bottom. They quickly developed a thick shell. ``These apatite shelters ... were apparently the dwelling place of the organisms,'' they wrote. These could be the starting points of kidney stones, which build up layer by layer, something like a pearl forming on a piece of sand inside an oyster. So they looked at kidney stones.

``We performed a pilot survey on 30 human kidney stones to assess whether nanobacteria might be found.'' Tests showed they were in all 30 kidney stones. Blood serum itself, they said, contains chemicals that suppress the formation of mineral layers. But they said they had found earlier that nanobacteria can be transported from the blood to the kidneys.

  Prostatitis
 A mid 2000 open label study of 16 treatment-recalcitrant CPPS patients, nanobacteria were proposed as a cause of prostatic calcification and the symptoms found in CPPS. Patients were treated with EDTA (to dissolve the calcifications) and 3 months of tetracycline (a calcium-leaching antibiotic with anti-inflammatory effects used in this study to kill the "pathogens"), and half had significant improvement in symptoms. Scientists have expressed strong doubts about whether nanobacteria are living organisms. Research in 2008 showed that "nanobacteria" are merely tiny lumps of abiotic limestone. Confirmation of the clinical efficacy of the treatment awaits placebo controlled studies.

Risks

  Increased Risk of Coronary Disease / Heart Attack
 
 

Risk factors for Nanobacteria Infection:
 
 
Symptoms - Female  Having possible/having breast calcification
 Although early in the discovery of nanobacteria and its consequences, calcium deposits in the breast and a link found to heart disease suggest that this bacteria may be present.

A large scale study of women for 20 years found breast ductal calcification was associated with a 1.9 fold increased risk of coronary heart disease, while breast vascular calcification was linked to a 1.4 fold increased risk. [Family Practice News, January 1, 2002;32(l): p.12]
 
 

Nanobacteria Infection can lead to:
 
 
Autoimmune  Scleroderma
 Researchers have identified tiny bacteria, known as nanobacteria, that may play a role in the formation of calcification found in scleroderma and other disorders. Cells infected by these bacteria develop deposits of the mineral apatite on their walls.

This is a very new field of research which is highly controversial, however it has recently attracted the attention of researchers at the Mayo Clinic and NASA. Nanobacteria have been found in kidney stones, Alzheimer's disease, heart disease, prostatitis, and some cancers.

A lot of the controversy surrounding nanobacteria has to do with its very name, in that some researchers do not believe that it represents a life form and thus cannot properly be named "bacteria", because the research on its purported nucleic acid has not been completed yet. Thus, some believe that "nanoparticles" would be a better description for it.
 
 

Recommendations for Nanobacteria Infection:
 
 
Detoxification  Chelation Therapy
 Rectally administered EDTA, given with tetracycline, has exhibited definite signs of pathologic calcium removal from the coronary arteries. Nanobacter Laboratories is apparently accumulating data showing that rectally administered EDTA in the presence of an antibiotic is able to deliver an important benefit to patients whose primary concern is a high calcium score on the ultra high-speed CAT scan study of their coronary arteries.

The nanobacteria theory and EDTA treatment are controversial and have opponents. The truth remains to be seen.

Drug

  Antibiotics
 Ciftcioglu and Kajander (confirmed later in clinical research by Mezo) found Tetracycline Hydrochloride to be the only antibiotic effective against Nanobacteria. Not even the close sisters of Tetracycline, Doxycycline and Terramycin, will work (Mezo). The larger studies have not shown Azithromycin to be effective in preventing coronary disease or in affecting itís outcome; Azithromycin does not prevent restenosis. Tetracycline, because of its chemical structure, is able to specifically kill nanobacteria. However, effective treatment regimes are still being worked out.

Treatment may require the use, at least for now, of NanobacTX, Dr. Mezo's Nanobiotic treatment. This is used in conjunction with tetracycline and EDTA to produce reports from cardiologists like James C. Roberts MD who say "I am seeing symptomatic improvement, often striking, in at least 90% of the patients I have treated with NanobacTX. This improvement is occurring in patients with new onset coronary symptoms, and in patients who are "too far gone" for any other standard or alternative therapies.
 
 


KEY
Weak or unproven link
Strong or generally accepted link
Proven definite or direct link
Likely to help
Highly recommended







GLOSSARY

Alzheimer's Disease:  A progressive disease of the middle-aged and elderly, characterized by loss of function and death of nerve cells in several areas of the brain, leading to loss of mental functions such as memory and learning. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia.

Angina:  Angina pectoris. Severe, restricting chest pain with sensations of suffocation caused by temporary reduction of oxygen to the heart muscle through narrowed diseased coronary arteries.

Anti-inflammatory:  Reducing inflammation by acting on body mechanisms, without directly acting on the cause of inflammation, e.g., glucocorticoids, aspirin.

Arthritis:  Inflammation of a joint, usually accompanied by pain, swelling, and stiffness, and resulting from infection, trauma, degenerative changes, metabolic disturbances, or other causes. It occurs in various forms, such as bacterial arthritis, osteoarthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis, the most common form, is characterized by a gradual loss of cartilage and often an overgrowth of bone at the joints.

Bacteria:  Microscopic germs. Some bacteria are "harmful" and can cause disease, while other "friendly" bacteria protect the body from harmful invading organisms.

Calcium:  The body's most abundant mineral. Its primary function is to help build and maintain bones and teeth. Calcium is also important to heart health, nerves, muscles and skin. Calcium helps control blood acid-alkaline balance, plays a role in cell division, muscle growth and iron utilization, activates certain enzymes, and helps transport nutrients through cell membranes. Calcium also forms a cellular cement called ground substance that helps hold cells and tissues together.

Cataract:  A steadily worsening disease of the eye in which the lens becomes cloudy as a result of the precipitation of proteins. Most cataracts are caused by the functions of the body breaking down. Eye trauma, such as from a puncture wound, may also result in cataracts.

Chelation:  Chelation therapy uses EDTA or other supplements that carry heavy metals such as lead, cadmium and arsenic, as well as other foreign substances, from the body. In the process of chelation, a larger protein molecule surrounds or encloses a mineral atom. The purpose of chelation is to increase the flow of blood to the vital organs and tissues of the body by reducing calcium deposits in the arteries and blood vessels.

Diabetes Mellitus:  A disease with increased blood glucose levels due to lack or ineffectiveness of insulin. Diabetes is found in two forms; insulin-dependent diabetes (juvenile-onset) and non-insulin-dependent (adult-onset). Symptoms include increased thirst; increased urination; weight loss in spite of increased appetite; fatigue; nausea; vomiting; frequent infections including bladder, vaginal, and skin; blurred vision; impotence in men; bad breath; cessation of menses; diminished skin fullness. Other symptoms include bleeding gums; ear noise/buzzing; diarrhea; depression; confusion.

EDTA:  (Ethylene Diamine Tetraacetic Acid): An organic molecule used in chelation therapy.

Electrocardiogram:  A test that shows a tracing of the electrical conduction of the heart.

Kidney Stone:  A stone (concretion) in the kidney. If the stone is large enough to block the tube (ureter) and stop the flow of urine from the kidney, it must be removed by surgery or other methods. Also called Renal Calculus. Symptoms usually begin with intense waves of pain as a stone moves in the urinary tract. Typically, a person feels a sharp, cramping pain in the back and side in the area of the kidney or in the lower abdomen. Sometimes nausea and vomiting occur. Later, pain may spread to the groin. The pain may continue if the stone is too large to pass; blood may appear in the urine and there may be the need to urinate more often or a burning sensation during urination. If fever and chills accompany any of these symptoms, an infection may be present and a doctor should be seen immediately.

Menopause:  The cessation of menstruation (usually not official until 12 months have passed without periods), occurring at the average age of 52. As commonly used, the word denotes the time of a woman's life, usually between the ages of 45 and 54, when periods cease and any symptoms of low estrogen levels persist, including hot flashes, insomnia, anxiety, mood swings, loss of libido and vaginal dryness. When these early menopausal symptoms subside, a woman becomes postmenopausal.

Mineral:  Plays a vital role in regulating many body functions. They act as catalysts in nerve response, muscle contraction and the metabolism of nutrients in foods. They regulate electrolyte balance and hormonal production, and they strengthen skeletal structures.

Nucleic Acid:  A chemical compound found in all viruses and plant and animal cells. RNA and DNA are the two principal types.

Placebo:  A pharmacologically inactive substance. Often used to compare clinical responses against the effects of pharmacologically active substances in experiments.

Prostate:  The prostate gland in men that surrounds the neck of the bladder and the urethra and produces a secretion that liquefies coagulated semen.

Serum:  The cell-free fluid of the bloodstream. It appears in a test tube after the blood clots and is often used in expressions relating to the levels of certain compounds in the blood stream.

Virus:  Any of a vast group of minute structures composed of a protein coat and a core of DNA and/or RNA that reproduces in the cells of the infected host. Capable of infecting all animals and plants, causing devastating disease in immunocompromised individuals. Viruses are not affected by antibiotics, and are completely dependent upon the cells of the infected host for the ability to reproduce.