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  Consequences of Gallbladder Surgery  
 
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One of the biggest crimes in modern American medicine is the amount of unnecessary surgery preformed. Gallbladder operation is the most common operation in North America. Every year, more than half a million people in the United States and more than 50,000 people in Canada undergo surgery to remove their gallbladders because of gallstones. Many of these surgeries are unnecessary. These patients just need to thin out their bile, clean up their diet and eliminate food allergens. Once a gallbladder has been removed, there are things you can do to reduce the consequences.
 

 
 

Consequences of Gallbladder Surgery suggests the following may be present:
 
 
Organ Health  Liver Detoxification / Support Requirement
 
 

Consequences of Gallbladder Surgery can lead to:
 
 
Nutrients  Vitamin A Requirement
  Vitamin D Requirement
 Bile is needed to enhance the absorption of fat soluble vitamins like Vitamin A, D, E and K.

  Vitamin K Requirement
  Vitamin E Requirement

Risks

  Increased Risk of Pancreatic Cancer
 Although there appears to be a significant risk of pancreatic cancer following gallbladder removal, there is some conflicting evidence.
 
 

Recommendations for Consequences of Gallbladder Surgery:
 
 
Animal-based  Bile Salts
 Once a gallbladder is removed it is important to be on bile acid supplements. They need to be taken with every meal in which fat is consumed otherwise your fats will not be properly emulsified and absorbed.

Lab Tests/Rule-Outs

  Digestive Enzymes / (Trial)
 High-quality fats, like the essential fatty acids, are necessary for good health. Without a gallbladder there will be a reduced ability to absorb them. You may need to use a high lipase digestive enzyme with any fat containing meal to aid their absorption.
 
 


KEY
Weak or unproven link
Strong or generally accepted link
May do some good
Highly recommended







GLOSSARY

Allergen:  A substance that is capable of producing an allergic response in the body.

Bile:  A bitter, yellow-green secretion of the liver. Bile is stored in the gallbladder and is released when fat enters the first part of the small intestine (duodenum) in order to aid digestion.

Cancer:  Refers to the various types of malignant neoplasms that contain cells growing out of control and invading adjacent tissues, which may metastasize to distant tissues.

Gallbladder:  A small, digestive organ positioned under the liver, which concentrates and stores bile. Problems with the gallbladder often lead to "gallbladder attacks", which usually occur after a fatty meal and at night. The following are the most common symptoms: steady, severe pain in the middle-upper abdomen or below the ribs on the right; pain in the back between the shoulder blades; pain under the right shoulder; nausea; vomiting; fever; chills; jaundice; abdominal bloating; intolerance of fatty foods; belching or gas; indigestion.

Gallstone:  (Biliary Calculus): Stone-like objects in either the gallbladder or bile ducts, composed mainly of cholesterol and occasionally mixed with calcium. Most gallstones do not cause problems until they become larger or they begin obstructing bile ducts, at which point gallbladder "attacks" begin to occur. Symptoms usually occur after a fatty meal and at night. The following are the most common ones: steady, severe pain in the middle-upper abdomen or below the ribs on the right; pain in the back between the shoulder blades; pain under the right shoulder; nausea; vomiting; fever; chills; jaundice; abdominal bloating; intolerance of fatty foods; belching or gas; indigestion.

Vitamin A:  A fat-soluble vitamin essential to one's health. Plays an important part in the growth and repair of body tissue, protects epithelial tissue, helps maintain the skin and is necessary for night vision. It is also necessary for normal growth and formation of bones and teeth. For Vitamin A only, 1mg translates to 833 IU.